Reality is Reality, and Clothes are Not the Problem

I can comfortably admit that I’m not a minimalist, but I am enjoying living with fewer things in my closet. As I’ve been exploring my relationship with my clothes and belongings, with shopping and consumption, I’ve had some realizations.

Closet Close Up

Reality is reality, and my wardrobe needs to reflect that.

Here’s a bit of my reality:

– My lifestyle: I spend most of my time parenting a toddler, and the high number of “dry clean only” pieces in my wardrobe does not reflect that. I need pieces that don’t wrinkle like crazy when I get on the floor to play with my daughter, pieces that wash easily if they get peanut butter or marker on them. When I do make clothing purchases, I need to pay extra attention to the care instructions.

– My body: I am average height, I have extraordinarily flat feet, I am a fair-skinned redhead, etc., etc., etc. I want to dress and appreciate the body I have, and I am beginning to accept that some styles and colors (like capri pants, ankle strap shoes, or lemon yellow) aren’t particularly flattering on me. No matter; there are plenty of things that suit me just fine! I can stop eyeing trends that don’t work for me and focus on what does (like bateau necklines, jewel tones, sleeveless tops).

– My budget: If I want to focus on acquiring fewer, higher quality clothes (which I do), I will have to start saving. My years old Target boots are finally falling apart, and I would like to invest in a new pair for Fall/Winter. But I’m not going to be able to do that with a $25 impulse purchase. I want to develop the discipline of saving money so I’ll have a reserve when I want to upgrade or need to replace something.

Clothes won’t fix a fashion crisis.

Before I began this experiment, I regularly found myself going through a pile of clothes in attempt to put together an outfit that I liked and felt good wearing. I refer to this “nothing to wear” moment as a fashion crisis. I used to feel that I didn’t have enough clothes (or good enough clothes) to put together great outfits. Then I started to feel like perhaps I had too many clothes (but still not the right type or fit). Oddly, or perhaps obviously, neither buying more clothes nor limiting my options has solved the problem of the fashion crisis. Even with thirty-three carefully selected, generally well-fitting and favorite items, I have still had instances of running through options and feeling I had nothing good to wear.

I’ve finally realized that the fashion crisis is not an issue of clothing but of self-image. When I find myself surrounded by the pile of rejected clothing, I need to look deeper. Am I lacking confidence, feeling insecure, fearing judgement? I know who I am is not determined by what I wear, and I want to make confident fashion decisions. Even if I have some misses, I am likely the only one who notices.

Having less in my closet gives me space to think.

Advertisements

2 comments

  1. Pingback: How To Overpack Without Really Trying (and Other Mistakes) | Hark at Home
  2. adventuresintheherenow

    I’m doing Project 333 too, and just came to the same conclusion about those “nothing to wear” moments! At first I thought I must have the wrong clothes because everyone else was saying how P333 had made dressing so easy and they never have “nothing to wear” moments. And sometimes it is because I am genuinely missing a crucial item of clothing or trying to make something work that doesn’t fit or suit me. But when I go through outfit after outfit, dismissing outfits that I have worn and enjoyed before, I realize that it’s my mood or circumstances that are getting me down. If I’m feeling insecure about myself or unhappy about the weather or the event I’m dressing for, nothing comes together right. Since I know I’ve put a lot of thought into my wardrobe and included my favorite pieces, I just put on something reliable and comfortable, and remember it isn’t about the clothes.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s