Category: vintage

Project 333: Some Fall Outfits

Now that I’m in the home stretch of my fall Project 333, I thought I’d share an update. This three month term began October 1st and ends December 31st, and so far temperatures have spiked into the 90s and dipped into the 20s Fahrenheit. That’s quite a swing to manage with around 33 items of clothing…

So I’ve cheated a couple times. I had to temporarily pull out my big vintage fisherman sweater and my Sorel boots, and I’ve realized I really don’t have a warm coat or many sweaters left. I’m well equipped for most Southern winters, but last winter (and several days of this one) have pushed my mild winter wardrobe to the brink. My pieces consist primarily of lightweight “fashion jackets” that do little to actually thwart the cold. I’m keeping an eye on the thrift stores for a few warmer pieces, and until then I’ll pile on the layers. Thankfully, most days have lows in the 40s-50s, temps that are comfortably manageable with what I have.

I’ve also decided to keep a few spots in my closet for vintage favorites. My small collection of vintage dresses contains more statement pieces than basics, so I haven’t figured out how to fit them in a 33 item capsule collection. But there are occasions that call for a statement. I’m bringing in a few of these pieces as a sub-collection.

This season I have replaced a few items that no longer work. I bought a new pair of dark wash, high waisted skinny jeans since my others were wearing out and getting a little pointy “tail” in the back. Do you know what I’m talking about? Once it happens, the pants are pretty much done. The old jeans moved on to the “lounge wear” category (or more accurately, the “work wear” category when I’m setting up vintage displays or sorting through things in the garage).

I also ditched the charcoal skirt. I didn’t try it on before including it in my collection (lesson learned!), and it doesn’t fit well at all anymore. I still wore it once, but I immediately pulled it from my closet after seeing the baggy, saggy selfies. A plaid skirt (found on super sale!) has taken its place. While not as versatile, the new skirt is a fun piece that fits my style well, and I expect to wear it plenty this winter.

Oh, and I added a couple new pairs of shoes! I’ll share my accessories at some point.

When I did follow the rules, which was most of the time, I took some bathroom mirror shots to show how I put everything together. Fall clothes are my favorite, and they’re the easiest for me to wear. I really love these clothes, and I don’t have to think too much about them or work too hard to make outfits. I’m wondering if those two things aren’t related, and maybe that’s actually the crux of capsule dressing: effortless style.

Here are some outfits, cheats not included:

Hark at Home - Fall 2014 Outfits

 

Do you have a favorite season for dressing? Have you found a way to incorporate statement pieces in a capsule wardrobe? Are you ready to try this in January?!?

Advertisements

Project 333: Capsule Wardrobe for Fall 2014

Today is October 1st, a day I have eagerly anticipated for at least the past two weeks, because today begins a new round of Project 333! This will be my third cycle of the minimalist fashion challenge, and I am looking forward to trying a capsule wardrobe during my favorite season.

If you are a new reader here or are unfamiliar with Project 333, here’s the one sentence summary: live for three months with a thirty-three item wardrobe.

It is radical, but it is not militant.

When I tell people about Project 333, the most common response is, “Wow, that’s so cool! I could never do that!” I get it. That’s how I felt when I first heard about Project 333 as well. I love shopping and have an eclectic sense of style, and I thought this sort of challenge would be great for people who didn’t like to shop and preferred monochromatic outfits. But sometime over the past year, a metamorphosis took place. I transformed from a curious observer into an impassioned participant.

Finding blogs and pins of capsule wardrobes (both actual and aspirational) inspired me, but here’s what finally won me over to Project 333: it is radical, but it is not militant. The rules are offered as guidelines, a structure within which to challenge yourself. They can easily be adapted or omitted or ignored. There are no grades for perfection, no awards given for adherence, and no shame or consequences for mistakes or even failure. It’s just a practical, doable set of steps to try out dressing with less.

So I adapted and adjusted and made it work for me. It’s my Project 333-ish.

And here are the clothing items I’m including for fall:

Hark at Home - Fall 2014 Capsule Wardrobe

 

Left to right from the top:

Row 1: Green Button Tank | Striped Tank (*T) | Asymmetrical Black Tank (V) | Blue Striped Tee (T)

Row 2: Bronze Swing Top | Wide Stripe Knit Top | Purple Dolman Sleeve Tee | Navy Cashmere Pullover (*V, T)

Row 3: Plaid Button Down (*V, T) | Chambray Shirt (*T) | Plum Vest (*T) | Black Cashmere Cardigan (*V, T)

Row 4: Rust Cardigan | Blue Knit Moto Jacket | Brown Barn Jacket (*T) | Plaid Coat (V, T)

Row 5: Faux Leather Jacket (*) | Skinny Jeans | Straight Leg Jeans | Green Jeans (*T)

Row 6: Charcoal Skirt | Rust Pleated Skirt (*V) | Purple Convertible Dress | Sleeveless Trench Dress

Row 7: Striped Shift Dress (*T) | Chambray Dress

The asterisk (*) marks new items added to my wardrobe, the (V) signifies vintage, and the (T) means the item was thrifted.

In case you’re counting, that comes to 26 items. I’ll include my shoes (which bring my count closer to 33-ish) and selected accessories in a later post.

If you’ve been contemplating taking the plunge into capsule wardrobe land, now is a great time to start! The seasons are changing, the temperature is dropping (at least in my hemisphere). Nature is undergoing a wardrobe makeover and heading toward minimalism. There are so many good resources to encourage and inspire you (like this Project 333 Blog Tour, in which I’m grateful to be included).

It does not have to be all or nothing. If you aren’t ready to have a closet quite this small, why not try packing up ten things and seeing if you miss them at the end of three months? Or donate one thing you’ve never liked wearing. Or try wearing thirty things for one month. Or spend hours browsing capsule wardrobes on Pinterest—hey, it’s inspiring! If you’re wanting to do this but have hesitations, just start somewhere. You might find, as I have, that less can feel surprisingly satisfying. In the meantime, “Yes, it is cool. And you could totally do it.” At least that’s how I answer my friends.

For the Love of Vintage

harkathome-transistor

My love of vintage started early. When I was six or seven, my dad gave me his old transistor radio. He showed me the dials, and we tuned in to hear The Beatles’ “Yellow Submarine”. That was the only music I ever heard through that little radio; every time I’ve flipped it on since, I’ve only gotten squeaks and squeals and static.

This object became a treasure for its nostalgia and its aesthetics. With its candy apple red plastic and shiny silver speaker, the transistor looked so different from the functional 1980s clock radio we had in our house. Hearing that one song over the airways became a magical memory. I also remember my dad telling me about hiding this radio under his pillow and secretly listening to rock ‘n’ roll when he was a child. When I see this radio, I see a story.

harkathome-books

When I was nine or ten, I went with my mom to a large antique market and made my first vintage purchase. I found these tiny leather books that captured my imagination. They were small and beautiful. The embossed leather covers and the smooth printed pages felt important. With my mom’s money, I bought them and began my vintage collection and discovered my interest in thrifting.

As I work toward simplifying my home and my life, I am considering the form, function, and significance of my possessions. The more I clean out and donate, the more I can appreciate the things that remain.

These pieces obviously hold meaning for me. They will stay in my home, not tucked away in a closet but displayed where I will see and enjoy them. I will continue to clean out and donate to make space for these things that are important to me.

Vintage items, even those not as sentimental as my radio or books, intrigue me because they have a built-in history. The unknown story behind these things piques my interest. Often the forms of vintage items bring back memories. I feel an attachment to history and humanity when I buy vintage.

Buying secondhand also carries an element of redemption. I appreciate discovering forsaken or forgotten things and giving them a new life.

Some of my favorite pieces are four oil paintings, all made by the same artist in the 1950s. This man was not famous and was likely a hobbyist, but his work spoke to me when I found it at a thrift store. I wish I could express to the artist that his work is being enjoyed more than half a century later.

This is how buying vintage and simplifying coexist for me. As I bring in new (old) things, I let go of things that are less beautiful, less interesting, or less important to me. Some of these things (the transistor radio, the books) will stay with me forever. Others will remain in my house for a season and then travel on to someone else. This refining ebb and flow allows me to collect without becoming overwhelmed. Rather than dulling my space or my life, simplifying spotlights what’s important and makes space for the interesting and the beautiful.

**********************************************************

P.S. I love helping other people incorporate interesting and beautiful vintage treasures into their homes and lives. If you live in the Atlanta area, come shop at Salvage tomorrow. It’s a one day event, and I’ll have a booth there (Hark at Home) along with another forty or so vendors selling vintage and handmade.

HarkAtHome-salvage