Category: outfits

Project 333: Some Fall Outfits

Now that I’m in the home stretch of my fall Project 333, I thought I’d share an update. This three month term began October 1st and ends December 31st, and so far temperatures have spiked into the 90s and dipped into the 20s Fahrenheit. That’s quite a swing to manage with around 33 items of clothing…

So I’ve cheated a couple times. I had to temporarily pull out my big vintage fisherman sweater and my Sorel boots, and I’ve realized I really don’t have a warm coat or many sweaters left. I’m well equipped for most Southern winters, but last winter (and several days of this one) have pushed my mild winter wardrobe to the brink. My pieces consist primarily of lightweight “fashion jackets” that do little to actually thwart the cold. I’m keeping an eye on the thrift stores for a few warmer pieces, and until then I’ll pile on the layers. Thankfully, most days have lows in the 40s-50s, temps that are comfortably manageable with what I have.

I’ve also decided to keep a few spots in my closet for vintage favorites. My small collection of vintage dresses contains more statement pieces than basics, so I haven’t figured out how to fit them in a 33 item capsule collection. But there are occasions that call for a statement. I’m bringing in a few of these pieces as a sub-collection.

This season I have replaced a few items that no longer work. I bought a new pair of dark wash, high waisted skinny jeans since my others were wearing out and getting a little pointy “tail” in the back. Do you know what I’m talking about? Once it happens, the pants are pretty much done. The old jeans moved on to the “lounge wear” category (or more accurately, the “work wear” category when I’m setting up vintage displays or sorting through things in the garage).

I also ditched the charcoal skirt. I didn’t try it on before including it in my collection (lesson learned!), and it doesn’t fit well at all anymore. I still wore it once, but I immediately pulled it from my closet after seeing the baggy, saggy selfies. A plaid skirt (found on super sale!) has taken its place. While not as versatile, the new skirt is a fun piece that fits my style well, and I expect to wear it plenty this winter.

Oh, and I added a couple new pairs of shoes! I’ll share my accessories at some point.

When I did follow the rules, which was most of the time, I took some bathroom mirror shots to show how I put everything together. Fall clothes are my favorite, and they’re the easiest for me to wear. I really love these clothes, and I don’t have to think too much about them or work too hard to make outfits. I’m wondering if those two things aren’t related, and maybe that’s actually the crux of capsule dressing: effortless style.

Here are some outfits, cheats not included:

Hark at Home - Fall 2014 Outfits

 

Do you have a favorite season for dressing? Have you found a way to incorporate statement pieces in a capsule wardrobe? Are you ready to try this in January?!?

Project 333: Capsule Wardrobe for Fall 2014

Today is October 1st, a day I have eagerly anticipated for at least the past two weeks, because today begins a new round of Project 333! This will be my third cycle of the minimalist fashion challenge, and I am looking forward to trying a capsule wardrobe during my favorite season.

If you are a new reader here or are unfamiliar with Project 333, here’s the one sentence summary: live for three months with a thirty-three item wardrobe.

It is radical, but it is not militant.

When I tell people about Project 333, the most common response is, “Wow, that’s so cool! I could never do that!” I get it. That’s how I felt when I first heard about Project 333 as well. I love shopping and have an eclectic sense of style, and I thought this sort of challenge would be great for people who didn’t like to shop and preferred monochromatic outfits. But sometime over the past year, a metamorphosis took place. I transformed from a curious observer into an impassioned participant.

Finding blogs and pins of capsule wardrobes (both actual and aspirational) inspired me, but here’s what finally won me over to Project 333: it is radical, but it is not militant. The rules are offered as guidelines, a structure within which to challenge yourself. They can easily be adapted or omitted or ignored. There are no grades for perfection, no awards given for adherence, and no shame or consequences for mistakes or even failure. It’s just a practical, doable set of steps to try out dressing with less.

So I adapted and adjusted and made it work for me. It’s my Project 333-ish.

And here are the clothing items I’m including for fall:

Hark at Home - Fall 2014 Capsule Wardrobe

 

Left to right from the top:

Row 1: Green Button Tank | Striped Tank (*T) | Asymmetrical Black Tank (V) | Blue Striped Tee (T)

Row 2: Bronze Swing Top | Wide Stripe Knit Top | Purple Dolman Sleeve Tee | Navy Cashmere Pullover (*V, T)

Row 3: Plaid Button Down (*V, T) | Chambray Shirt (*T) | Plum Vest (*T) | Black Cashmere Cardigan (*V, T)

Row 4: Rust Cardigan | Blue Knit Moto Jacket | Brown Barn Jacket (*T) | Plaid Coat (V, T)

Row 5: Faux Leather Jacket (*) | Skinny Jeans | Straight Leg Jeans | Green Jeans (*T)

Row 6: Charcoal Skirt | Rust Pleated Skirt (*V) | Purple Convertible Dress | Sleeveless Trench Dress

Row 7: Striped Shift Dress (*T) | Chambray Dress

The asterisk (*) marks new items added to my wardrobe, the (V) signifies vintage, and the (T) means the item was thrifted.

In case you’re counting, that comes to 26 items. I’ll include my shoes (which bring my count closer to 33-ish) and selected accessories in a later post.

If you’ve been contemplating taking the plunge into capsule wardrobe land, now is a great time to start! The seasons are changing, the temperature is dropping (at least in my hemisphere). Nature is undergoing a wardrobe makeover and heading toward minimalism. There are so many good resources to encourage and inspire you (like this Project 333 Blog Tour, in which I’m grateful to be included).

It does not have to be all or nothing. If you aren’t ready to have a closet quite this small, why not try packing up ten things and seeing if you miss them at the end of three months? Or donate one thing you’ve never liked wearing. Or try wearing thirty things for one month. Or spend hours browsing capsule wardrobes on Pinterest—hey, it’s inspiring! If you’re wanting to do this but have hesitations, just start somewhere. You might find, as I have, that less can feel surprisingly satisfying. In the meantime, “Yes, it is cool. And you could totally do it.” At least that’s how I answer my friends.

Capsule Wardrobe: End of Summer Assessment

Project 333 Late Summer Outfits 2014

Project 333 Late Summer Outfits 2014

For the past two weeks, my toddler daughter has been asking if it’s fall yet. Every time she’d see a leaf float down into the yard, she would cheer, “It’s FALL!” And now it finally is!

Like my daughter, I’m ready for a new season. At this point in the year (and in my three month capsule wardrobe), I’m itching for a change. Fall is my favorite season, and the corresponding clothes are a big part of that.

As October approaches, I am assessing my wardrobe from the last season and deciding what stays and what goes. Wearing the same 30-something pieces of clothing for three months has taught me some things about myself.

“Sporty” is not a word I would ever use to describe myself or my style, and with that acknowledgement, I’ll be sending my floral track pants and my printed sweatshirt on to new homes. Those outfits felt a bit more casual than I like, and wearing heels to dress them up was impractical for my daily life. No big deal–I spent less than $15 to try out the look, so I don’t feel guilty about consigning or donating the clothes.

I’m also ready to admit that there is a certain length of skirt I will not confidently wear without tights or leggings. I had one such skirt in my summer capsule, and though I wore it often in winter (with tights), I didn’t wear it once in the past three months. That’s okay, too. I’ll skip this skirt for my fall collection and maybe bring it back when the weather is consistently cool enough to wear tights with it.

Several things have also worn out after three (or in some cases, six) months of regular wear. I have already replaced my striped tee, and I’ll be swapping my striped dress and striped tank for my fall closet. Hooray for new stripes!

I bought the (nearly) new striped pieces from the thrift store, and I spent less than $25 on all three of them.

Other retiring pieces include my black crochet top tee (too faded), my beloved beaded sandals (falling apart, and I’ve already glued them back together twice), and the light wash jeans. I usually wear dark wash jeans, but I thought a lighter wash might be nice for summer. So many fashion bloggers made them work, and I felt inspired to give it a try. I paid less than $8 for those secondhand Anthropologie jeans, and it was worth it to discover that I do actually prefer a darker wash.

With the change in seasons, the worn out pieces, the mistakes, and the items I’ve been wearing regularly for months (some since March!), I am packing up or giving away almost everything in my summer collection. Some of the pieces will go in the drawer until it’s time to reassess next spring.

I’ve had some hits and misses in my wardrobe choices this summer, and I feel like I have a clearer understanding of my style. For summer, I included some pieces that I liked but weren’t my favorites; they seemed like necessary basics. For fall, I’m ditching that philosophy. I pretty much love every single thing that will be in my closet from October to December. I feel happier with my closet overall, and I’ll be interested to see if I miss those basic pieces. In the meantime, I’ve started putting outfit ideas together, and nearly all the combinations–even the weird and quirky ones–feel especially like me. I can’t wait to share them.

So…October (and thus a new season of Project 333) starts in a week. Are you ready to try a minimalist wardrobe challenge?

Project 333: A Month of Summer Outfits

I’m about six weeks into my second round of Project 333, a minimalist wardrobe challenge that involves wearing just thirty-three items of clothing for three months. I bend the rules by not counting shoes and accessories in my 33 items, though I’ve chosen to limit those as well. I started this round with 28 items of clothing, and I have since lost one item and gained two (more on that later!) to bring my working total to 30. I left a little space in my count this time so I could fill some holes or bring in a couple fresh items, and I think this is a good approach for me.

Here are some snapshots of outfits I’ve put together this round:

HarkAtHome-summeroutfits1

Like I mentioned, I have made a couple modifications to my collection since beginning this round. The mint tee (seen in the fourth outfit from the top left) has not survived. Pasta with marinara sauce, a toddler, and overly ambitious stain removal tactics left the top with two large bleached out circles. So that shirt has left the collection.

I have added two items that were both hand me downs (hand me overs?): a maxi dress not yet pictured and a pair of straight leg designer jeans (seen in the bottom row, third from the left). Free clothes can be a help or a hindrance to dressing with less. In this case, these two items fit me and my style well, and they filled gaps in my wardrobe. I was thankful to accept these generous offers.

I’ve also noticed some differences in seasonal capsule wardrobes. In my first round, I tried to make a different outfit for each day of the project. I made a game of it, and I enjoyed the creative styling challenge. Making unique combinations was easier when the weather was cooler and I could layer sweaters, jackets, and scarves.

Though I have fewer layering options in the summer heat, I’m still finding plenty of new combinations. I’m also repeating outfits at will. The second outfit from the top left (striped tee, dark skinny jeans, black canvas sandals) has been one of my summer favorites.

Another aspect that makes summer more challenging is laundry. I live in the Deep South of the United States, and the weather gets HOT! Sweat is an unfortunate summer reality, and my items require more frequent laundering this time around. I have adjusted, but I’ll be happy when the weather cools down again in a few months.

I have now been dressing with less since March, and I am dressing with more freedom and confidence than ever before. I haven’t fully cracked the code on my impulse shopping, but I’m making strides. I can now say with assurance that I have enough. Thirty-three items are enough–more than enough, even. I would rather have a closet contain 33 items I love than one bursting with things I sort of, kind of like.

Are you thinking about trying a capsule wardrobe or Project 333? Are you already dressing with less? I’d love to hear about your experience!

Thrifting a Capsule Wardrobe

My last post was all about simplifying, but what if you need to add to your closet?

I’ve already admitted I have a bit of a shopping problem. In fact, that’s one of the main reasons I decided to simplify my wardrobe. I wanted to say goodbye to regrets and impulses that clogged up my closet and were seldom worn. Cutting back on the retail therapy is helping me maintain my cleaner closet.

But clothes do wear out, especially if you are wearing them more often! Lifestyles, jobs, seasons, sizes, and bodies change. Sometimes we do need to shop in order to maintain a functional wardrobe. This is a huge relief to me, as I’m not ready to give up shopping entirely.

I wanted to let you in on my biggest secret for building and maintaining a capsule wardrobe on a budget: thrifting.

Here are some looks from my late winter/early spring wardrobe. Each of these outfits includes at least one secondhand item.

Can you guess which items were bought secondhand?

Can you guess which items were bought secondhand?

Nearly a third of my summer capsule is secondhand. My closet includes clothes from  J. Crew, Banana Republic, Anthropologie, Nordstrom, Lord & Taylor, and Stuart Weitzman. All of these items together cost me less than $50 because I bought them at the thrift store. Most of these items appeared barely worn, and some were new with tags.

I don’t care much about brands, but I am thinking more about quality as I shop. Buying things secondhand makes higher quality items more budget friendly.

I started shopping at thrift stores when I was in junior high school, primarily so I would have a wardrobe that was different from what my classmates were wearing. I liked the idea of building a look that wasn’t straight off the mall racks, and I still have an eclectic style in my home and my wardrobe. I continue to enjoy treasure hunting and regard my best thrift finds somewhat like trophies. I’ve tried to restrain myself from enthusiastically responding to a compliment with “Thanks! This was only five bucks!”, as I’ve found most people aren’t as excited about my deals as I am.

If you’re new to thrifting and think you’d like to give it a try, here are some of my guidelines:

1. Look for quality and value. Familiarize yourself with labels so you can recognize whether a shirt came from Walmart or Neiman Marcus. In general, a secondhand Old Navy tank top is not going to be a good value, as it could be found new and on sale for a similar price. Check for condition (no pilled sweaters, stains or twisted side seams). Factor any necessary dry cleaning or alterations into the total cost. For example, I found $100 jeans for $7. Even though they need a $10 alteration for the best fit, they are still a good total investment for me.

2. Try it on. Even if a tag lists a size you don’t normally wear, it might be worth trying on the item. Clothes sometimes end up in thrift stores because of mismarked sizes or inaccurate fit, and these mistakes could be to your advantage. Sizing conventions for vintage clothing and international brands also vary greatly, so don’t count something out based on listed size alone. Also consider whether an inexpensive alteration might make the item a perfect fit. If you’re handy with a sewing machine, you could even do these yourself!

3. Have a plan. Make a list of items you’re looking for to replace or fill the current or next season of your wardrobe. It’s helpful to think in advance of wardrobe needs when thrifting, as it’s unlikely you’ll find the exact item you’re looking for on the first try. My striped tunic dress is starting to wear out, so this is something I look for every time I go to the thrift store. I don’t need it urgently, but I can see the need on the horizon. I also want some type of olive or muted green top for fall, so I look through these color sections when I shop.

4. Try out trends. If you’ve been wanting to try a trend but don’t want to invest in an item you may only wear for a season or two, thrifting is a great way to give it an inexpensive go! I found my floral joggers (new with tags!) for $6 at the thrift store. I’ll enjoy them while I wear them, and I won’t feel bad about donating them back to the thrift store when I move on. For trendy items that aren’t likely to become classics you wear for years, buying secondhand can keep your cost per wear low. Since trends are often revisiting fashions of earlier eras, you may even find a vintage item that looks fashion forward (I’m looking at you, 90s crop tops!).

5. Go often. I regularly explore three or four thrift stores in my area. Because I go often, I am generally familiar with the merchandise and can spot new items fairly quickly. I actually enjoy searching through every item, but becoming familiar with stores in my area makes it easier to quickly browse. Merchandise also turns over regularly, so going often gives you the best chance of finding the item on your list before someone else does.

6. Search outside your area. Thrift stores often vary greatly by location. I like to occasionally look in other parts of town for a different selection, and I also try to find thrift stores when I’m traveling. Areas favored by retirees may have great vintage merchandise, and places inhabited by young professionals may have good options for an office work wardrobe. You never know what you’ll find, but trying out different places will give you the broadest selection.

7. Shop online. If you don’t have thrift stores conveniently nearby, or if you prefer not to rummage through racks, you now have some great online options. Sites like Twice and thredUP buy and sell quality used clothing. You can search by size, color, or brand. People can buy and sell clothes directly with one another through apps like Poshmark, and even Goodwill has the option to shop a selection of goods online. Of course, there’s always ebay (where I recently bought gently used boots for fall for 20% of their retail cost) and the vintage section of Etsy. If you don’t mind paying a little more for convenience, you may find shopping secondhand online can help you build your budget capsule wardrobe.

What about you? Are you an expert treasure hunter with more tips to share? Are you a fledgling thrifter ready to give it a try? Do secondhand clothes have a place in your wardrobe?

Summer Capsule Wardrobe!

On July 1st, I started a new season of my capsule wardrobe experiment. After completing my first round this spring and donating carloads of clothes, my closet and I feel freer. By having fewer things in my closet, I find I actually have more (and better things) to wear.

So for the next three months (give or take), here is what’s in my closet:

Summer 2014 tops

Tops (16):

1. Bronze drop shoulder top

2. Southwestern print tank

3. Mint tee

4. Floral silky tank

5. Striped tee

6. Confetti peplum

7. Plum halter

8. Striped tank

9. White knit reversible tank

10. Cream tee

11. Crochet/patterned top

12. Black tank

13. Black crochet tee

14. Harvest gold cardigan

15. Rust cardigan

16. Denim jacket

Summer 2014 bottoms

Bottoms / Dresses / Etc. (12):

17. Black flowy shorts

18. Rust high-waisted shorts

19. Denim midi skirt

20. Red print skirt

21. Dark wash skinny jeans

22. Medium wash jeans

23. Floral joggers

24. Mustard crops

25. Black linen romper

26. Striped dress

27. Chambray dress

28. Eyelet midi dress

Summer 2014 shoes

Shoes (8):

– Black canvas sandals

– Beaded sandals

– Lace-up booties

– Neutral heels

– Outdoor wedges

– Black brogues

– Black booties

And, for practicality:

– Golashes

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Are you living with a capsule wardrobe or thinking about trying it?

Here are some great resources if you’re wondering where to start:

Project 333

Unfancy

Cuyana

Project 333: Season 1 Follow Up

A new season of Project 333 began July 1st (more on that later!), so now seemed like a good time to follow up on my first season. I began my own version of Project 333 in March and continued through May. I had a “between seasons” grace period for June and have now begun a new three month season.

Here are the outfits from season one, all put together:

Hark at Home: Spring 2014 Capsule Wardrobe

Project 333 2014 Spring CapsuleI survived three months with only 33 clothing items (plus shoes and accessories–my modified rules), and I actually enjoyed it–at least for the first eight or nine weeks. After that point, the weather started changing. I started getting a little bored. I made some extra money and bought a couple new shirts. I just…lost a bit of steam.

But I also took two carloads of donations to the thrift store! I kept going back to my stored clothes and further culling my stash, and I know that will continue.

I’ve noticed a modification in my shopping habits. My purchases are much more thoughtful, more intentional. I still make some impulse thrift buys, but my “It was on sale at Target!” spending is down significantly if not altogether gone. I consider this a win. I’m also looking more critically at fit and quality when buying clothes. Rather than shopping only for pleasure, I’m shopping with the goal of building a wardrobe that reflects my style and suits my lifestyle.