Project 333: Capsule Wardrobe for Fall 2014

Today is October 1st, a day I have eagerly anticipated for at least the past two weeks, because today begins a new round of Project 333! This will be my third cycle of the minimalist fashion challenge, and I am looking forward to trying a capsule wardrobe during my favorite season.

If you are a new reader here or are unfamiliar with Project 333, here’s the one sentence summary: live for three months with a thirty-three item wardrobe.

It is radical, but it is not militant.

When I tell people about Project 333, the most common response is, “Wow, that’s so cool! I could never do that!” I get it. That’s how I felt when I first heard about Project 333 as well. I love shopping and have an eclectic sense of style, and I thought this sort of challenge would be great for people who didn’t like to shop and preferred monochromatic outfits. But sometime over the past year, a metamorphosis took place. I transformed from a curious observer into an impassioned participant.

Finding blogs and pins of capsule wardrobes (both actual and aspirational) inspired me, but here’s what finally won me over to Project 333: it is radical, but it is not militant. The rules are offered as guidelines, a structure within which to challenge yourself. They can easily be adapted or omitted or ignored. There are no grades for perfection, no awards given for adherence, and no shame or consequences for mistakes or even failure. It’s just a practical, doable set of steps to try out dressing with less.

So I adapted and adjusted and made it work for me. It’s my Project 333-ish.

And here are the clothing items I’m including for fall:

Hark at Home - Fall 2014 Capsule Wardrobe

 

Left to right from the top:

Row 1: Green Button Tank | Striped Tank (*T) | Asymmetrical Black Tank (V) | Blue Striped Tee (T)

Row 2: Bronze Swing Top | Wide Stripe Knit Top | Purple Dolman Sleeve Tee | Navy Cashmere Pullover (*V, T)

Row 3: Plaid Button Down (*V, T) | Chambray Shirt (*T) | Plum Vest (*T) | Black Cashmere Cardigan (*V, T)

Row 4: Rust Cardigan | Blue Knit Moto Jacket | Brown Barn Jacket (*T) | Plaid Coat (V, T)

Row 5: Faux Leather Jacket (*) | Skinny Jeans | Straight Leg Jeans | Green Jeans (*T)

Row 6: Charcoal Skirt | Rust Pleated Skirt (*V) | Purple Convertible Dress | Sleeveless Trench Dress

Row 7: Striped Shift Dress (*T) | Chambray Dress

The asterisk (*) marks new items added to my wardrobe, the (V) signifies vintage, and the (T) means the item was thrifted.

In case you’re counting, that comes to 26 items. I’ll include my shoes (which bring my count closer to 33-ish) and selected accessories in a later post.

If you’ve been contemplating taking the plunge into capsule wardrobe land, now is a great time to start! The seasons are changing, the temperature is dropping (at least in my hemisphere). Nature is undergoing a wardrobe makeover and heading toward minimalism. There are so many good resources to encourage and inspire you (like this Project 333 Blog Tour, in which I’m grateful to be included).

It does not have to be all or nothing. If you aren’t ready to have a closet quite this small, why not try packing up ten things and seeing if you miss them at the end of three months? Or donate one thing you’ve never liked wearing. Or try wearing thirty things for one month. Or spend hours browsing capsule wardrobes on Pinterest—hey, it’s inspiring! If you’re wanting to do this but have hesitations, just start somewhere. You might find, as I have, that less can feel surprisingly satisfying. In the meantime, “Yes, it is cool. And you could totally do it.” At least that’s how I answer my friends.

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7 comments

  1. therealjlow

    I love your thoughts on the capsule! I think the best bit of the Project 333 is making it fit around your life and your dressing decisions. What I also love is the amount of colour that you have included there are far too many greyscale capsules and not enough colour ones!! I can’t wait to see what you pull together and how the challenge goes for you!

    Jess

  2. lethally

    It’s so awesome to see someone else who is doing the Project 333 and is focusing on vintage and thrifted items. Do you find that older vintage items tend to be manufactured at a higher quality standard? That’s what I’m finding, especially as you move into items pre-1980s.

    • harkathome

      Yes! I see a big difference in quality, even among brands that still exist. Even the pieces I have from as recent as the late 80s-early 90s seem to be better made. They fit better and hold up more to washes and wears, which is so important for Project 333 clothes. I also like that vintage clothes allow for individuality that can’t be found, say, at Target or Old Navy.

      • lethally

        Agreed. It’s not just the sewing either – it’s the fabric itself. I’ve bought items that are recent that even after the first wash look like rubbish. NOT impressed! But vintage items – even items that were obviously made as “budget” clothing – wear so well, even after decades and countless washes.

        I just wish I could find more good quality vintage, but it’s really HARD in New Zealand – especially being nearly six feet tall as well! 😦

  3. Pingback: Project 333: Some Fall Outfits | Hark at Home
  4. Pingback: Capsule Wardrobe: Top 14 of 2014 | Hark at Home

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