Category: fashion

Seven Tips To Start Simplifying Your Wardrobe

Full disclosure: this wardrobe simplifying thing is still a work in progress for me. I have clothes in two closets, one dresser, and two under-bed boxes. I still have too many clothes. But I am making progress!

Here is my closet from February and my closet now:

Closet then and now

I have also done some major cleaning out in the second (guest room) closet. A couple months ago, that was an “open at your own risk” type of closet, the type to open v-e-r-y c-a-r-e-f-u-l-l-y. It was packed to a comical, pile-toppling point. If you came to my house now, you could not only open the closet door, but also safely step inside! The single rack is still full of clothes on hangers (mostly my off season or vintage pieces), but a guest could easily stash a suitcase there. Progress.

I’m still learning, and I feel my relationship to my belongings being transformed. Simplifying is a process.

If you are interested in simplifying your wardrobe and don’t know where to begin, here are some ideas. These are things I’ve found helpful in my closet makeover, and perhaps they can get you started on your own journey.

1. Start the “keep” pile with your favorites and your basics.

Begin by setting aside the items you love and wear often, the things you know you want to keep. Sometimes it’s easier to eliminate some clothes once you’ve identified what stays. Also include your wardrobe basics or staples, like your favorite jeans.

Note that your basics might not be typical neutrals, like a trench coat or a white oxford shirt. Just because these items appear on many “must have” lists does not mean you must have them! I do have a trench, but in a darker tan that suits me better than classic khaki, and I prefer my blue button down to white, especially since I spend much of my time with a toddler–crisp white and everyday childhood messes do not mix well for me. High-waisted, rust-colored shorts might not be everyone’s basic, but for me they are a staple. They go with all my favorite tops, can be worn with flats or heels, and I even sometimes rock them with tights and a sweater in the fall.

I love pattern mixing, and for me, stripes are a basic. I wear my striped tops with just about any and everything. A capsule wardrobe can be black and white and gray, but it certainly doesn’t have to be.

Find your own staples, pieces you feel great wearing and can easily combine into outfits. Let these be your signature pieces and form the base of your wardrobe.

2. Eliminate duplicates.

You may find you have two or three very similar items but generally prefer wearing one of them. When I put my colorful tanks (or my oxford shirts, or my patterned skirts) side by side, I usually have a clear front-runner. The others serve as back ups or extras, and I can free up closet space by keeping the favorites and donating seconds. Now instead of going to my second best when my favorite item is dirty, I just do laundry. It’s slightly less convenient, but I actually feel happier and more comfortable wearing only my top tier clothing.

3. Store out of season and out of size items.

If you have the space (under bed storage, an extra drawer or closet space), store things you aren’t currently wearing, or at least move them out of the front of your closet. Since I had a baby two and a half years ago, I finally put those last couple maternity dresses in storage. No need to have these items right in my sight line when I’m dressing each day. The weather has also gotten hot, so under bed boxes and space bags keep my sweaters out of the way and moth-free during the summer. When the seasons change, it feels like a treasure hunt to rediscover what’s been hiding in storage. If space is at a premium, a wardrobe bag in the back of your closet or a box on a high shelf could keep these items out of the way.

4. Remove things that are worn out, stained, or beyond repair.

When I examined some of the clothes I wasn’t wearing, particularly former favorites, I discovered that many of them were worn out. It’s hard for me to say goodbye to once beloved clothes, but I am not going to feel good wearing the pilling sweater or the shirt with twisted side seams. If the items cannot be cleaned or repaired, I am better off without them crowding my closet. If you are particularly attached to something that is no longer fit for daily wear, consider whether it could transition to lounge wear. This is the best second life I’ve found for moth-eaten sweaters that I still like but wouldn’t wear out of the house.

5. Find new ways to wear what you have.

This won’t get anything out of your closet, but it might grow your appreciation for some things you already have. This is one of my favorite uses for Pinterest, where I keep a secret board of capsule wardrobe inspiration. I included the mustard cropped chinos from my spring capsule in my summer collection, and when I search “mustard pants outfit” or “mustard color combo”, I get lots of new ideas. If you have a piece you’re unsure about or wonder if certain colors work together, search for how others have worn them and find inspiration. You can do a regular internet search as well, but I like how easy it is to collect and store inspiration on Pinterest.

Also think about whether some pieces could be worn unconventionally. Two of my dresses also serve as tops when tucked into a skirt or knotted at the waist with a pair of pants. The two outfits on the right, from my late winter/early spring Project 333, show that in action.

Striped Dress and Chambray Tunic

6. Discover what you’re actually wearing (and eliminate what you’re not wearing).

Try the hanger trick or keep a log (written or photographic), or use an app or online resource to document what you wear for a season. If you are struggling with some of the previous tips, this one might lend some objectivity to the simplifying process. Becoming aware of unworn clothes may make it easier to part with them or could motivate you to make new outfits and transform these items into favorites.

Seeing what’s not working can also help with future shopping. Common themes among my unworn clothes included demanding care requirements (dry clean only, etc.), unflattering styles and colors, or items unsuited for the climate where I live. I now check care labels when I shop, and I limit “hand wash” and “dry clean only” items. I have also avoided buying additional cold climate items like heavy sweaters or lined pants; I live in the Deep South of the United States, and I will rarely have a chance to wear those clothes.

7. Go for a trial separation if you have trouble letting go.

Sometimes absence makes the heart grow fonder, and sometimes out of sight is out of mind. And sometimes clichés also apply to clothes. Try stashing clothes about which you are undecided. I kept a pile in that doom closet for a couple months and then reassessed. Most of those items have since been donated, but I’m holding on to a few until I make my fall wardrobe. A box or bag in an out of the way place can give you a break from the clothes. If you haven’t accessed the stash or thought about its contents for a specified time (I recommend between one and six months), you might be ready to part ways. You could do this sight unseen or go through items again–whatever works for you. Or you might discover you are more attached to an item than you realized and choose to keep it in your closet.

**********************************************************

Ready to try it? Let me know how it goes!

Have you already cleaned out your closet? What helped you get started?

Summer Capsule Wardrobe!

On July 1st, I started a new season of my capsule wardrobe experiment. After completing my first round this spring and donating carloads of clothes, my closet and I feel freer. By having fewer things in my closet, I find I actually have more (and better things) to wear.

So for the next three months (give or take), here is what’s in my closet:

Summer 2014 tops

Tops (16):

1. Bronze drop shoulder top

2. Southwestern print tank

3. Mint tee

4. Floral silky tank

5. Striped tee

6. Confetti peplum

7. Plum halter

8. Striped tank

9. White knit reversible tank

10. Cream tee

11. Crochet/patterned top

12. Black tank

13. Black crochet tee

14. Harvest gold cardigan

15. Rust cardigan

16. Denim jacket

Summer 2014 bottoms

Bottoms / Dresses / Etc. (12):

17. Black flowy shorts

18. Rust high-waisted shorts

19. Denim midi skirt

20. Red print skirt

21. Dark wash skinny jeans

22. Medium wash jeans

23. Floral joggers

24. Mustard crops

25. Black linen romper

26. Striped dress

27. Chambray dress

28. Eyelet midi dress

Summer 2014 shoes

Shoes (8):

– Black canvas sandals

– Beaded sandals

– Lace-up booties

– Neutral heels

– Outdoor wedges

– Black brogues

– Black booties

And, for practicality:

– Golashes

****************************************************

Are you living with a capsule wardrobe or thinking about trying it?

Here are some great resources if you’re wondering where to start:

Project 333

Unfancy

Cuyana

Project 333: Season 1 Follow Up

A new season of Project 333 began July 1st (more on that later!), so now seemed like a good time to follow up on my first season. I began my own version of Project 333 in March and continued through May. I had a “between seasons” grace period for June and have now begun a new three month season.

Here are the outfits from season one, all put together:

Hark at Home: Spring 2014 Capsule Wardrobe

Project 333 2014 Spring CapsuleI survived three months with only 33 clothing items (plus shoes and accessories–my modified rules), and I actually enjoyed it–at least for the first eight or nine weeks. After that point, the weather started changing. I started getting a little bored. I made some extra money and bought a couple new shirts. I just…lost a bit of steam.

But I also took two carloads of donations to the thrift store! I kept going back to my stored clothes and further culling my stash, and I know that will continue.

I’ve noticed a modification in my shopping habits. My purchases are much more thoughtful, more intentional. I still make some impulse thrift buys, but my “It was on sale at Target!” spending is down significantly if not altogether gone. I consider this a win. I’m also looking more critically at fit and quality when buying clothes. Rather than shopping only for pleasure, I’m shopping with the goal of building a wardrobe that reflects my style and suits my lifestyle.

 

Project 333: Outfits Part 2

Here is my second set of outfits from my Project 333 wardrobe experiment. (You can find the first set of outfits here.)

I began this project with the suspicion that my constantly growing wardrobe and packed closet were not adding to my life. Wearing only thirty-three items of clothing for a set period of time seemed like a fairly simple way to see if I might enjoy living with less. Turns out I do.

In seven weeks, I have not worn the same outfit twice, and I have not grown bored with my options. It almost feels like a game making new outfits from my options, and I find what I’m wearing is more creative and more reflective of who I am. I can confidently say that you do not have to be a minimalist to enjoy a simplified wardrobe.

Though I’ve done some online window shopping, I have not added to my wardrobe during these weeks. I’ve even left my “off limits” clothes (those not selected for my thirty-three items) alone, with the exception of making two swaps.

I chose not to include shoes and accessories in my count, though I did limit my selection of these items as well. I have had a tougher time sticking to my pared down options here, and I’ve added back some packed away shoes and jewelry. I’ll keep working with those things to find what works for me.

Now that Easter is here and Lent is over, I’m setting a new goal to extend the project with my current items through June. I feel like I’ve taking one significant step toward simplifying my life and having my reality more closely reflect my priorities, and I’m looking forward to seeing where this takes me.

Anyone else care to join me and give this a try? Where might you benefit from less in your life?

How To Overpack Without Really Trying (and Other Mistakes)

Packing PlansEarlier this month, our family went on a week-long beach vacation. I expected my limited closet would make packing especially easy, and I beamed with pride at my great planning and organization. I made a list in advance, picked things that layered well and could be combined into several outfits, and then laid everything out to admire my work. I mean, look at that spread: efficient accessories, options for temperature swings . . . I felt really pleased with myself.

And then I started filling the suitcase, which was a standard, rolling carry on. My packed suitcase was thoroughly packed, and I suspected I had packed too much. I pulled a stack of items off the top, removed a pair of shoes, and zipped my luggage easily.

None of the items pictured above were among the things removed from the suitcase and left at home. Rather, I had taken out pajamas and lounge clothes. For a week-long beach trip with my family, I had brought about a dozen outfits’ worth of clothes and only one set of pajamas. We also had in-unit laundry, which I used while there but completely ignored while packing.

I forgot that reality is reality. I spent half my time in lounge clothes or swim wear, relaxing with my family. A pile of lounge wear doesn’t make a Pinterest-worthy picture, but fewer outfits and more pajamas would have been a better fit.

Obviously overpacking for a car trip a few hours away is a mistake of little consequence. Still, I’m trying to cut down on these fashion mistakes and the time, money, and stress that they cost me.

My unedited closet contained plenty of mistakes: the mint green tank that was on sale but isn’t the right color for me; the designer skirt that was a great deal but is a size too small and only fits while I’m standing and wearing super-constrictive shapewear; the silk top in the perfect color that must be dry cleaned after every wear. Those three items collectively cost me less than $60, but those are only three mistakes of many.

Meanwhile, this is my basic black tank top:

Black tank with hole

Yes, that’s a large hole. It extends beyond the seam into a long run, and it gapes right around my left hip whenever I wear it. That $60 spent on mistakes could replace my basic tank along with my favorite tights that have a run and can only be worn with boots. I think I would even have enough left over to re-sole a beloved pair of heels and possibly alter my charcoal skirt that’s a bit too big.

Not one of those investments has the appeal of buying a new top, even a top in the wrong color. Similarly, packing pajamas sounds far less exciting than packing outfits I will not have an opportunity to wear. I am swept up in the thrill of the new and the idealized, and I end up missing what I actually need.

I’m hoping that with greater intention and objectivity, I will make fewer fashion mistakes. I have grace for myself in this learning process, and I know I’m growing in the art of packing and living lightly. And next time I go shopping, will someone please remind me to replace that hole-y black tank top?

Project 333: A Progress Report

For the past six weeks I have dressed from a thirty-three item wardrobe inspired by Project 333. Though you can start anytime, Project 333 participants generally begin their three month terms to coincide with the seasons (January, April, July, October). I began in early March along with Lent, and I “gave up” about three quarters of my wardrobe to try living with less. Some of these items have been donated or will be sold, and others are packed away for the season or because I am not yet ready to part with them.

While I’ve been engaged in this limited wardrobe experiment, I have recorded my outfits with notes and photographs. I am also keeping a “wear count” because I’m curious about which items I wear frequently. Since I have bridged seasons with my time frame, some items have not yet been worn due to weather (i.e., my linen romper–come on already, Spring!), and I have swapped out at least one item that was decidedly Winter (a lined brown tweed jacket) for something more Spring-ish (a half sleeve hooded jacket).

What I’ve found most interesting is that I have not worn the exact same outfit twice. With the twenty-seven clothing items I’ve actually worn, and with an intentionally limited selection of shoes and accessories, I have made a unique outfit every single day. Documenting my outfits has inspired me to find different combinations.

I am more self-aware and less self-conscious. I feel like I have a better idea of which shapes and proportions work for my body, and I feel more confident in what I’m wearing. Viewing my style in photographs has given me slight objectivity, and building outfits from a smaller, preferred selection of items is producing better results for me. I guess it’s similar to cooking with the best ingredients available to you; even simple recipes taste delicious when built from quality ingredients.

Based on my wear count, here are my most popular items:

1. Dark wash skinny jeans (14 wears)

2. Dark wash bootcut jeans (7)

3. (tie) Rust cardigan; denim jacket (6)

4. (tie) Chambray tunic; mustard cropped chinos (5)

5. (tie) Cream lace top; purple dolman tee; striped dress (4)

While I wait for warmer weather so I can actually wear the shorts and skirts that I included, I’ll remain reassured that I have more than enough. I’m not bored with my options yet. Though I committed to the project through Easter, I have decided to extend it through June. I may swap out a couple more items between now and then, but I know I’ll have plenty to wear.One Sweatshirt, Six Ways(Oh, the possibilities! Here is one sweatshirt, six slightly different ways. I cut the tag out of the sweatshirt, and now it’s reversible. I ended up wearing the combo in the lower right.)

A Wardrobe Manifesto

I have now spent a month living in my limited wardrobe. Whether these present constraints remain a short-term experiment or become a permanent lifestyle choice, I’ve discovered that I do prefer having fewer things in my closet. I like knowing what I have and having what I like (as opposed to what I think I should like). In order to maintain some of this newly carved out space in my closet and my life, I have laid out some goals for building and maintaining my wardrobe:

I want to enjoy wearing my clothes as much as I enjoy buying them.

  • This is the primary thing I want to consider when shopping.
  • Most of my favorite clothes were not impulse purchases. Either I pondered the item for days or weeks before finally buying, or I looked for a specific type of item (i.e., a striped dress) for months before finally finding a deal and purchasing one.

I want to curate, not accumulate.

  • My wardrobe is an ongoing design project that requires regular editing. I want my additions to be thoughtfully and intentionally made with regard to my style, shape, lifestyle, and budget, and I will keep the total number of items limited with a “one in, one out” policy.
  • If a new item isn’t worthy of replacing something already in my closet, it probably doesn’t belong in my wardrobe.

I want my purchases to be long-term commitments rather than flings.

  • I want to buy the best quality I can afford and wear things for many years.
  • I will try things on, try them out at home with things I already own, return things that don’t work, and have things altered in a timely manner if necessary.
  • I would like to build a savings reserve so I’ll be able to replace or repair something when it wears out.
  • If I want to experiment with a trend, I can “rent it” (i.e., buy it secondhand for not much money and donate it back after a season).

I can’t buy off unpleasant emotions.

  • I recognize that feelings of sadness, grief, insecurity, powerlessness, or anger do not disappear when I throw money around. I am only buying myself a temporary distraction.
  • I want to choose other ways of dealing with my feelings, preferably ones that don’t leave me with souvenirs. Do I really want a closet full of clothing that commemorates my bad days?

Fear has no place in my wardrobe.

I don’t have to buy something because I’m afraid . . .

  • that I’ll miss a great deal
  • that I need it to look stylish
  • that I’m missing out on a trend or that my look is dated

I don’t have to keep something because I’m afraid . . .

  • that I wasted money
  • that I’ll need or want it after it’s gone
  • that I’ll hurt someone’s feelings (this one is especially difficult for me)

*********************************************************************

What about you? Do you have rules for what comes into your closet or your home? Or do you find the idea of “rules” restrictive (as I do)? In that case, what sort of guidelines direct your shopping?

And if you are rules-averse but still interested in trying a minimalist wardrobe experiment, here’s a great article from Courtney Carver of Project 333.

 

Project 333: List and Outfits

I am three weeks into my Project 333 wardrobe experiment. In my modified version of the project, I cut my closet down to thirty-three items, not including shoes and accessories (though I also limited those categories).

I am no photographer, but I’m enjoying documenting my outfits. Having fewer items encourages me to put things together in more interesting ways. I’m also finding that a picture gives me a more objective look at what I’m wearing, and I have adjusted some outfits by adding a belt, tucking or untucking a shirt, or changing shoes after seeing how it looked on screen.

If you are interested in the details, here’s what made the cut:


Tops:

1. White knit tank

2. Ivory silk tee

3. Ivory lace top

4. Abstract floral tank

5. Black crochet top tee

6. Navy / rust crop sweater

7. Wide stripe top

8. Teal cashmere v-neck

9. Purple dolman sleeve top

10. Blue floral outline sweatshirt

11. Pinstripe / dot button down

12. Peach owl button down

13. Blue button down

14. Mustard short sleeve cardigan

15. Purple crop ruffle cardigan

16. Rust cardigan

17. Blue knit moto jacket

18. Denim jacket

19. Brown tweed jacket

Bottoms:

20. Dark skinny jeans

21. Bootcut jeans

22. Black ponte ankle pants

23. Mustard cropped chinos

24. Coral chino shorts

25. Rust high-waisted shorts

26. Green A-line skirt Charcoal gray fluted skirt (I found the green skirt wrinkled too easily for regular wear, so I swapped it out)

27. Abstract print flared skirt

Dresses and Wild Cards:

28. Chambray tunic

29. Breton stripe dress

30. Gray structured dress

31. Purple infinity wrap dress

32. Black linen romper

33. Charcoal Versalette (new version available here)


I’m looking forward to transitioning into warmer weather with my limited closet. Since I began my wardrobe minimizing between seasons, I have several Spring-y items I’ve not yet been able to wear. Hopefully these pieces will show up in the next round of outfit shots.

Trying on Less

I love to shop. Even with a tight budget, I get an intoxicating rush when I discover a perfectly fitting dress on the sale rack or find a secondhand shirt for a fraction of its original retail price. I am swept up in the thrill of the bargain, and if the deal is “too good to miss”, I will overlook a multitude of issues (the fit is slightly off, it’s not really my style, I already have something similar, I have no occasion to wear it in the foreseeable future…). I will reason that I am making a good investment, that I am actually saving money by spending so little, and I will leave with a shopper’s high and a happiness that will never be matched when I actually wear the item.

And I may not even wear it. I may try it on briefly before abandoning it for an outfit I like better, and my “super amazing steal of a deal” will languish in my closet.

You know the game where you try ten things on while getting dressed and nothing quite works? And then you end up wearing your favorite jeans and sweater for the third time that week. And then you are fifteen minutes late to wherever you are supposed to be because the simple, daily act of getting dressed took way too long. Tell me I’m not the only one who plays this game.

I love to shop, and yet a nagging discontentment has crept in as I’ve added more and more to my tiny closet. My closet is crowded, but I struggle to find something to wear. My heart feels crowded, too.

I am ready to try something different, something radical.

For Lent this year, I am giving up (at least temporarily) the vast majority of my wardrobe, and I’ll wear just thirty-three things from now until Easter.

I’ll be doing a modified version of Courtney Carver’s Project 333, which challenges participants to dress from a 33-item wardrobe for three months. Official P333 rules include shoes, accessories, and outerwear in the count; I’ll be counting these separately. Pajamas, loungewear, gym clothes, and underwear (including tights, socks, etc.) aren’t included in the count. Though I’m bending the rules a bit, I do plan to work from a limited selection of all of these items. One of my favorite quotes from the website is this: “This is not a project in suffering. If you need to create a version of Project 333 that works better for you, do it.” I’m going with that.

422fe-photo6
I’ve made lists, sorted piles of clothes, selected, swapped, and worked my way down to 33 things (plus three coats) which are now back in the closet. I moved everything else to the guest room closet, which is now overflowing. Please don’t open that door if you are at my house . . .

I am looking forward to the challenge, and I’m also fighting some trepidation. I wonder if I will get bored of my limited choices. I’m bridging two seasons, so I’m concerned I may not have all I need to bridge dramatic temperature swings. I worry about what other people will think. Will anyone even notice or care if I’m wearing the same thing more often? Were these the items I was wearing all the time anyway? I wonder if I’ll feel guilty for forsaking all those other clothes, as if inanimate objects somehow know they are being neglected. I am considering what it would mean to fail and put everything back next week . . . or to succeed and end up giving most of it away.

Lent is a time of remembering and practicing sacrifice, of reexamining priorities and values, a time of not only giving up the bad, but of giving up the good in favor of the better. All that extra space in my closet makes me anxious, but it also makes me excited. There is space, breathing room, and that feels like the start of something better.